tax payers

Amending Tax Returns After Submission


Submitting tax returns by the deadline date always comes with a sigh of relief to many tax payers. However, every now and then – just after making your submission – you may discover that you have made an error on your returns. At times, such errors may include a deduction that could have reduced your taxes or an income you did not include in the returns.

For starters, you cannot correct the tax returns after submission – you carved out your signature under the penalties of perjury declaring that the information was true and final. However, the IRS provides an opportunity to make an amendment to the tax returns submitted. Amendments and corrections may seem more less the same. However, an amendment assumes that information provided initially was true to begin with but you are introducing some new information to affect the returns.

If you find yourself in such a situation where you need to make an amendment, there are various options that you can pursue to handle the situation. These options are explained below:

Wait for the IRS to Complete Processing

If the returns were erroneous due to information you did not have at the time of submitting them, then you are legally not obliged to make an amendment. In other words, if reports of incomes made arrived a day or two after you had made the returns and you were unaware of such incomes, you need not file an amendment. continue reading..

Other errors that will not require an amendment are mathematical errors. The IRS will make the corrections to such errors. This includes wrong entries made on the form. However, if such errors amount to more tax payments, they will add the due amount in your tax account and inform you about such dues. Other errors that the IRS will normally overlook include an unattached schedule, an omitted Form W-2, grammatical errors on the form, and other small omissions and inclusions. In such cases, it is best to wait for the IRS to complete processing the returns before making a decision on whether to file an amendment. If the IRS deems an omitted document as important, they will simply contact you and ask you to mail it to them.

Amendment of Fundamental Information

tax payersIf on the other hand you were aware of fundamental information that you did not include in your tax returns, then you should make an amendment at the earliest time possible. You could have made an income in a given year but may have forgotten to include it in the schedule. As soon as you discover such an error, you should provide an amendment and pay any taxes due at the earliest time possible to avoid an IRS audit that may result in penalties and interests.

Amendments for Tax-Beneficial Corrections

If the information omitted from the tax returns would result in lesser taxes paid, then though filing an amendment is optional, you will want to file the amendment to reduce your due taxes or claim a refund. Visit http://www.irishtimes.com/business/personal-finance/refunds-denied-to-two-taxpayers-overcharged-by-revenue-1.2924582 today!

To make an amendment of your tax returns, you will need to fill out Form 1040X indicating the amendment. The form can be downloaded from the IRS website. However, any refunds due after an amendment will take much longer to process as such amendments are manually reviewed before the refund is released.